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Gene A. Chesley papers

 Collection 0168-MDHC
Gene A. Chesley (1935-1981) was a highly regarded scenic designer, theatre historian, and teacher. Chesley taught in the Dramatic Art Deparment at the University of California Davis from 1963 until his death at age 46 in 1981. As a UCD faculty member, Chesley began an eleven-year project to identify and document extant historic theatres, opera houses, and performance halls in all fifty states. He became a renowned authority on American theatres built between 1800 and 1914, and a strong advocate for the renovation and preservation of theatres. The bulk of the Chesley Collection concerns research conducted for the National List of Historic Theatre Buildings, as well as Chesley's involvement in restoration projects undertaken during the 1970s. The depth of information concerning individual theatres varies considerably, depending on the thoroughness of the person(s) who responded to Chesley's letter of inquiry. Some files contain only a newspaper account of the renovation of a particular theatre while other files hold a broad range of materials including the original correspondence; reports and forms; playbills and programs; newspaper articles; photographs, slides, postcards; blueprints and drawings; historical files; and project files.

Dates

  • 1800-1984
  • Majority of material found within 1969-1982

Use and Access to Collection

This collection is open for research.

Duplication and Copyright Information

Photocopies of original materials may be provided for a fee and at the discretion of the curator. Please see our Duplication of Materials policy for more information. Queries regarding publication rights and copyright status of materials within this collection should be directed to the appropriate curator.

Extent

19.50 Linear Feet

Scope and Content of Collection

The bulk of the Chesley Collection concerns research conducted for the National List of Historic Theatre Buildings and Chesley's involvement in restoration projects undertaken during the 1970s. The material dates from the early 1800s to 1984, with most of the collection dating from 1969 to 1982.The depth of information concerning individual theatres varies considerably, depending on the thoroughness of the person(s) who responded to Chesley's letter of inquiry. Chesley's questionnaire was often returned with very little information, although in other cases, respondents carefully documented both the history and the architecture of the site. Some files contain only a newspaper account of the renovation of a particular theatre while other files hold a broad range of materials, including original correspondence, playbills, newspaper articles, and photographs.

The Chesley Collection includes correspondence; reports and forms; playbills and programs; newspaper clippings; photographs, negatives, and slides; postcards; blueprints and drawings; and historical and project files.

Biography

Gene A. Chesley (1935-1981) was a highly regarded scenic designer, theatre historian, and teacher. Chesley taught in the Dramatic Art Department at the University of California, Davis, (UCD) from 1963 until his death at age 46 in 1981. As a UCD faculty member, Chesley began an eleven-year project to identify and document extant historic theatres, opera houses, and performance halls in all fifty states. He became a renowned authority on American theatres built between 1800 and 1914 and a strong advocate for the renovation and preservation of theatres.

Chesley's interest in documenting America's historic theatres began in 1964 when he noticed a dilapidated local opera house. When I first came to the Davis campus, I lived in Woodland for six months. I realized the Woodland Opera House was there and the scenery was there too. Later on, some colleagues and myself made an effort to save the scenery and create some interest.

The Woodland Opera House renovation inspired Chesley's search for other California theatres and, then, nationwide. Chesley's efforts led to the National List of Historic Theatre Buildings, which was initiated in 1970 to provide a "body of written and graphic materials describing the location and condition of buildings still standing in the United States built between 1800 and 1900, designed specifically for theatrical performances."

As his reputation grew, Chesley, and his extensive network of experts, consulted with individuals and groups interested in the rehabilitation of decaying theatres. Chesley published numerous articles on theatre restoration and served as a consultant for several projects including the rebuilding of the Eagle Theater (c.1849) in Sacramento, California, and the restoration of the Woodland Opera House (c.1896) in Woodland, California. Chesley's files expanded to include a variety of materials on theatre renovation, restoration, and rebuilding. Chesley commented in 1975 that while not all buildings are worth saving, old theatres are being restored constantly. Maybe it's nostalgia, but people have discovered that it is sometimes not always desirable to level out these old buildings and make parking lots or pancake houses.

In 1976, Gene Chesley, Robert D. Stoddard, director of development of the Grand Opera House in Wilmington, Delaware, and Michael P. Price, executive director of the Goodspeed, an 1871 opera house in Connecticut, formed the League of Historic American Theatres (LHAT). Chesley served as the organization's first vice president and was president at the time of his death in 1981. Dedicated to encouraging and assisting in the preservation, restoration, and use of historic American theatres, the League continued Chesley's efforts to identify performance halls in all fifty states. It also published a directory containing information on the architecture, history, and current use of existing theatres. The League organized annual national and regional meetings, sponsored a newsletter, and supported restoration efforts across the country. In 1980, the LHAT hired an executive director and relocated its offices to the National Theater in Washington, D.C. In 1997, the LHAT moved its offices to Baltimore, Maryland.

The League of Historic American Theatres is an international nonprofit association concerned with the cultural and architectural heritage of historic theatres. Its members work locally to serve and rehabilitate theatres in large and small communities across North America. League members include preservation activists, specialists in the preservation and renovation of historic buildings, scholars in American architectural and cultural history, and experts in theatre operation and management. After Chesley's death, John W. Frick and Carlton Ward continued Chesley's original project and eventually published the Directory of American Theatres (NY: Greenwood Press, 1987) on behalf of the League.

Arrangement

The collection is organized as four series
Series 1
State Theatre Files
Series 2
Personal and Project Files
Series 3
Blueprints
Series 4
Photographs, Negatives, and Slides

Custodial History and Acquisition Information

After Gene Chesley's death in 1981, Mrs. Marie Chesley donated the collection to the League of Historic American Theatres. The materials were deposited at Princeton University where library professionals inventoried Chesley's files and featured the Chesley Collection in an exhibit. In December 1996, the Chesley Collection was deeded to the National Trust for Historic Preservation Library Collection, and processed through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, Design Arts Program.

Related Material

The papers of Joan Dillon, author of American Theaters: Performance Halls of the Nineteenth Century are held by the Archives and Manuscripts Department, University of Maryland Libraries.

The Theatre Historical Society of America has a number of collection related to theatre history. Known as the American Theatre Architecture Archives it is dedicated to preserving the architectural, cultural, and social history of America's theatres. More information can be found at http://www.historictheatres.org

Processing Information

Throughout processing at both Princeton University and the National Trust for Historic Preservation Library Collection, the staff mainly respected Chesley's original organization. The exception to following Chesley's original order was the separation of oversized materials, blueprints, photographs, slides, and negatives from the original files; separation sheets mark the original locations. Processing the Chesley Collection involved the transfer of materials to acid-free folders and boxes, the removal of all metal (paper clips, staples, and binder clips), and the separation of photographs, slides, blueprints, and oversized materials into series and/or oversized boxes. The slides were organized alphabetically by State, City, then Theatre and then numbered consecutively. Non-acidic photocopies of newspaper articles replace the original clippings.
Title
Guide to the Gene A. Chesley papers
Status
Completed
Author
Processed by D. Melissa Hiblish, May 1998; Revised by Adina Wachman, March 2000; Revised by Jennie Levine and Sarah Heim, February 2001.
Date
2001-02-01
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Code for undetermined script
Language of description note
Finding aid written in English

Library Details

Part of the Special Collections and University Archives

Contact:
University of Maryland Libraries
Hornbake Library
4130 Campus Drive
College Park Maryland 20742
301-405-9212