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College of Agriculture records

 Collection 0047-UA
The teaching of agriculture at the University of Maryland began with the opening of the Maryland Agricultural College in 1859. The establishment of the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station at the college almost thirty years later, in 1888, enhanced the focus on agriculture. The College Park campus of the University of Maryland, created by the Maryland General Assembly in 1920, was originally divided into thirteen educational units, including the College of Agriculture. The college underwent many name changes during its history and is now known as the College of Agricultural and Natural Resources. The records of the college primarily document the tenure of Gordon M. Cairns as dean and consist of correspondence, reports, committee information, appointment books, budget files, financial ledger books, and photographs.

Dates

  • 1916-1973
  • Majority of material found within 1951-1969

Use and Access to Collection

This collection is open to the public and must be used in the Special Collections reading room. Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

This collection contains restricted material, please check the series and folder listings for additional information.

Duplication and Copyright Information

Photocopies of original materials may be provided for a fee and at the discretion of the curator. Please see our Duplication of Materials policy for more information. Queries regarding publication rights and copyright status of materials within this collection should be directed to the appropriate curator.

Extent

20.75 Linear Feet

Scope and Content of Collection

The College of Agriculture records span the period 1916 to 1973. The bulk of the materials date from 1951 to 1969, during the tenure of Gordon M. Cairns as dean of the college. The collection consists of correspondence, reports, committee information, Dean Cairns' appointment books, budget files, financial ledger books, and photographs. Among the chief correspondents are members of the faculty of the College of Agriculture, including Robert Lamar Green, Morley A. Jull, Wendell S. Arbuckle, Ronald Bamford, and William E. Bickley, as well as members of the wider campus community, including Dean R. Lee Hornbake, Executive Vice President Albin O. Kuhn, Acting University President Thomas B. Symons, and University of Maryland President Wilson H. Elkins. Correspondents of note outside of the University of Maryland include United States Secretary of Agriculture Orville Freeman; President Galo Plaza of Ecuador; and business leader Franklin P. Perdue.

Administrative History

The teaching of agriculture at the University of Maryland began with the opening of the Maryland Agricultural College in 1859. The college initially offered courses in agriculture, chemistry, geology, mineralogy, surveying, veterinary surgery, botany, entomology, and ornithology, as well as courses not directly related to the field of agriculture, such as philosophy, history, English, and other modern and ancient languages. The establishment of the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station at the college almost thirty years later, in 1888, enhanced the focus on agriculture. The station's original purpose was the investigation of those agricultural problems of most interest and concern to the farmers of the state and the publication and dissemination of the results of such experiments. It has worked closely with agricultural faculty, staff, and students since its inception. Agriculture remained a primary element of the curriculum when the Maryland General Assembly created the University of Maryland in 1920 by merging the campuses in Baltimore and College Park.

The new University of Maryland in College Park was originally divided into thirteen educational units, including the College of Agriculture. The college consisted of departments and courses in horticulture; agronomy; plant morphology and mycology; plant physiology; plant pathology; forestry; dairy husbandry; animal husbandry; and poultry husbandry. Subjects taught also included animal pathology and veterinary medicine; bacteriology and sanitation; geology and soils; farm management; zoology, which included general zoology, entomology, bee culture, and fish culture; farm equipment; and short courses in agriculture. P. W. Zimmerman, former professor of plant industry, was the first dean of the College of Agriculture. In 1925, Harry J. Patterson, who also served simultaneously as director of the Agricultural Experiment Station, succeeded Zimmerman. Patterson was followed by Thomas B. Symons in 1938, who held a joint appointment as director of the Extension Service.

After 1920, the focus of the university expanded beyond agriculture to become a more balanced center of learning, offering courses in a number of diverse fields including anthropology, Asian and East European languages and cultures, computer science, engineering, and a host of other majors in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. The university grew enormously during the years after World War II. Gordon M. Cairns (1951-1979) led the college for the majority of this period of change, and the college remained an active part of the campus, as well as the local, national, and world agricultural communities.

Following the tenure of Gordon Cairns as Dean of the College of Agriculture, the college underwent a rapid succession of leaders: Earl H. Brown (1980-1981), Larry N. Vanderhoef, acting (1981-1982), Donald A. Hegwood (1982-1986), Raymond J. Miller (1986-1989), Paul H. Mazzocchi, acting (1989-1993), and Craig Oliver, interim (1993-1994). Thomas A. Fretz served as dean of the college for ten years from 1994-2004. After Fretz stepped down to become Execturive Director of theNortheastern Regional Association of State Agricultural Experiment Directors, Bruce Gardner served as acting dean until the current dean, Cheng-i Wei, accepted the position in 2006.

In 1995, the College of Agriculture became the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and the administrative home of the Agricultural Experiment Station. The college offers a variety of academic programs that apply science, management, design, and engineering to improve the environmental and agricultural conditions of the world. Although agriculture is no longer the main focus of the University of Maryland, the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources currently maintains an enrollment of approximately one thousand undergraduate and graduate students.

Arrangement

The collection is organized as three series:
Series 1
Adminstrative Files
Series 2
Ledgers
Series 3
Photographs

Custodial History and Acquisition Information

The University of Maryland Libraries received the College of Agriculture records from Gordon M. Cairns, dean of the College of Agriculture, in August 1973.

Related Material

The University of Maryland Libraries hold many collections relating to agriculture in the state, particularly those concerning the university's involvement in agricultural ventures. Related materials can be found within the University Publications collection: UPUB A37, Agriculture, College of. The University Archives also contain the papers of Robert Lamar Green, Ronald Bamford, and Morley Jull, professors and heads of the departments of agricultural engineering, botany, and poultry science, respectively. The University Archives also hold the papers of Harry J. Patterson, who served as Dean of the College of Agriculture from 1925 to 1938, and Thomas B. Symons, who served as Dean from 1938 to 1951. Additional department holdings include the records of the departments of botany, entomology, horticulture, agriculture and resource economics, and poultry science, as well as the records of the Agricultural Experiment Station and the Cooperative Extension Service.

Processing Information

Processing of the College of Agriculture records began in August 1997. Three series were created from the records. University publications were transferred to the University Publications collection. Meeting minutes of the University Senate were transferred to the Records of the University Senate; duplicate copies of the minutes were discarded. One box of ballots from the 1954 election of district supervisors for the Howard soil conservation district was destroyed. A manual pocket adding machine, including case, instructions, and stylus, was removed and transferred to the memorabilia collection. The records also contained seven and a half linear feet of Cooperative Extension Service annual reports which were removed and transferred to the Records of the Cooperative Extension Service. Some personnel information, regarding faculty and staff of the College of Agriculture as well as prospective candidates for positions within the college, was destroyed. Maps and architectural drawings were removed from Series 1: Administrative Files and placed in oversize storage. Photographs were removed and transferred to the photograph collection. Paper clips and staples were removed and replaced by strips of acid-free paper and inert plastic clips. The materials were placed in acid-free folders and boxes.
Title
Guide to the College of Agriculture records
Status
Completed
Author
Processed by Michelle DeMartino.
Date
1997-10-01
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Code for undetermined script
Language of description note
Finding aid written in English.

Library Details

Part of the Special Collections and University Archives

Contact:
University of Maryland Libraries
Hornbake Library
4130 Campus Drive
College Park Maryland 20742
301-405-9212